Tag Archives: WCP

Mat Men

“It’s Friday night in the middle of February, and the Annandale Volunteer Fire Department is electric. There’s the scent of fried food and the sound of butt rock in the air. A couple hundred people are seated around a deep blue wrestling ring, surrounded by wrestlers hawking merchandise off card tables. Promptly at 8 p.m., the rowdy crowd is treated to three hours of everything from a half-ton tag team to a pair of female Hot Topic devotees. The crowd eats it up, chanting, cheering, booing, and throwing streamers overhead. This is pro wrestling, in all its carnivalesque grandeur. This is NOVA Pro Wrestling.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.

Are Abhi//Dijon R&B’s Next Breakout Stars?

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“Last month, Abhi//Dijon tweeted, “we are r & b to the core and will wear that label if people need it but trust we intend on turning the genre and everything else inside out.” It was a bold, confrontational statement from the duo, which is comprised of Ellicott City-raised, Los Angeles-based musicians Abhi Raju and Dijon Duenas. But with the release of their latest EP, Montana, it definitely reads as a mission statement.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.

Can Sofar Sounds Bring Intimacy Back to Live Music?

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No matter how transcendent a concert at 9:30 Club, Rock & Roll Hotel, or U Street Music Hall, the live music experience is plagued by the same distractions: overtalking conversationalists, smart phone documentarians, boisterous drink-orderers. But while this may feel like another problem with the New D.C., it’s probably universal. “No matter if you’re in Jakarta, Melbourne, or Chicago, it’s the same issues,” Rafe Offer concurs. “Live music has become background noise.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.

Meet The Grand Ancestor Sound System, D.C.’s First And Only Custom Built, Jamaican-Style Stack

“During the day, the wholesale warehouses around the oasis of gentrification that is Union Market bustle and brim with commerce and action. At night, it’s a different story: Heading northwest on Morse Street NE leads to an abandoned market and bare loading docks surrounded by panel vans and off-duty food trucks.

One night in July, I headed towards one of these warehouses for a party. I felt lost amid this industrial and commercial decay until I turned a corner and heard the bassline and patois of reggae gradually getting louder. This must be the place. Past industrial mixers and slop sinks is a dark room strung up with Christmas lights, a DJ table butted up against a speaker cabinet that measures 10 feet tall.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.

On Its Debut Album, Technophobia Channels ’80s Darkwave

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“There is something strangely familiar and comforting about Technophobia’s debut album Flicker Out—especially if you’ve ever gone long stretches wearing only black or stayed up late watching John Carpenter films just for the soundtracks.

As Technophobia, Katie and Stephen Petix craft darkwave dirges full of icy arpeggios and pneumatic death marches, their analog synthesizers and drum machines battling as Katie unleashes operatic vocals, incanting gothic poetry. The duo’s music draws from the tried-and-true tropes of synthpop and industrial, connecting the dots between early Ministry and Pretty Hate Machine–era Nine Inch Nails to contemporaries like Cold Cave and Light Asylum.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.

Comic Release: D.C. Comedy Scene is Gaining Steam, But Can it Rival NYC And L.A.?

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“The basement of the Big Hunt is nicknamed Hell’s Kitchen, thanks to its devilish decor, claustrophobic ambience, and red-light glow. The name was especially fitting on a recent Friday night.

A capacity crowd was there for an alt-comedy show, but the mood was tense, as if the people assembled didn’t sign up for an evening of absurd, surreal, and awkward bits about parental sex and nuclear winter. For some, it was comedy nirvana; for others, comedy hell.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.

Maracuyeah Celebrates Five Years of All-Inclusive, No-Bullshit Latin Dance Parties

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Five years ago, Kristy La Rat and DJ Mafe were in a car on their way to New York to interview and see Oakland-via-Panama rap duo Los Rakas, lamenting the fact that independent artists like that never made it to D.C. Inspired by the show’s energy, Kristy and Mafe decided they would start booking the artists they loved, and Maracuyeah was born. And as the DJs and organizers of Maracuyeah celebrate their fifth anniversary tonight, it’s only fitting that the show will be headlined by Los Rakas, the duo that started it all.

Maracuyeah is many things: a DJ collective, a roving party, a talent booker, a community-building safe space. And for five years, Maracuyeah has been responsible for some of the best dance parties in D.C: inclusive celebrations by and for people of all races, countries of origin, genders, and sexualities—sweaty and sexy tributes to Latin music’s past, present, and future. Or as Mafe describes it, “the original Latin undeground tropical love party.”

Read more in the Washington City Paper.