Tag Archives: Washington Post

See the enigmatic Cashmere Cat, pop remixer extraordinaire

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“When Cashmere Cat emerged at the beginning of the decade with his scintillating remixes of songs by Lana Del Rey and Miguel, there wasn’t much known about the Norwegian producer: His real name wasn’t public, and he tended to cover his face in photos. That wasn’t unusual in the underground world of electronic dance music in which he traveled, among other producers who uploaded remixes and originals to SoundCloud and built up an alluring aura with their anonymity.”

Read more in the Washington Post.

Tory Lanez only goes halfway at Fillmore

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“The modern-day rap show is plagued by many pitfalls: an overreliance on background vocal tracks. DJs with itchy sound-effects trigger fingers. Subwoofers that obliterate not just eardrums but iPhone microphones. Seizure-inducing strobe lights. An overemphasis on getting the party started rather than actually performing. Unfortunately for the audience at the Fillmore Silver Spring on Wednesday night, Canadian rapper-singer Tory Lanez fell into many of these pits.”

Read more in the Washington Post.

Sweater Beats bares his soul at U Street Music Hall

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“Thanksgiving is a day of coming home. For Antonio Cuna, this year’s Thanksgiving was a homecoming. Cuna, who produces electronic music as Sweater Beats, grew up in Rockville, and late Wednesday night — or, more accurately, early Thursday morning — he brought his debut live tour to U Street Music Hall. “I see so many familiar faces. I’m getting emotional,” he told the crowd after his first song. “I’m home right now.””

Read more in the Washington Post.

A celebration of an iconic songbook at Smokey Robinson’s Gershwin Prize concert

“On Wednesday night, Smokey Robinson received the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, joining the esteemed company of songwriters such as Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder and Billy Joel. First bestowed in 2007 to Paul Simon, the prize recognizes work that has a “significant and uplifting influence on the world of music and on our society as a whole.” The only thing debatable about Robinson’s winning of the Gershwin Prize is why it didn’t happen sooner.”

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What Donald Trump learned about politics from pro wrestling

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“Trump might not have been playing by the rules of politics, but he won the game. So how did he do it? Those looking to his career as a developer or reality TV host came up short in predicting Trump’s survival and eventual victory, because those are only part of the story. The most important lessons Donald Trump ever learned were in a pro wrestling ring.”

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How a small D.C. record label became a hotbed of modern Ethiopian sounds

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“In its first two years, D.C.-based record label 1432 R has stood out for its ethos and its ear, but also for a more curious reason. Even though 1432 R takes its name from a District street address, its catalogue is dominated by music from more than 7,000 miles away — Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Launched in summer 2014, 1432 R has released nine records, almost all featuring Addis Ababa-based producers Mikael Seifu and Endeguena Mulu; one is by Ethiopian American co-founder Dawit Eklund. Their music seamlessly brings together house music grooves, the stutter of U.K. garage, an uneasy electronic ambience, and — perhaps most notably — Ethiopian folk music.”

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The pure and joyous uplift of Chance the Rapper

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“He’s only 23, but Chance the Rapper has already outgrown his moniker. After breaking through with his instant-classic “Acid Rap” mix tape in 2013, Chance dabbled in band-leading on last year’s “Surf,” an album credited to collaborators Donnie Trumpet and the Social Experiment. But it is “Coloring Book,” a mix tape he released in May, on which Chance has found his true — or at least next — calling: spiritual leader of a gospel-rap revival.”

Read more in the Washington Post.