Tag Archives: Washington Post

Rapper Father spit in a fan’s mouth at Songbyrd. She raised her arms in celebration.

“Father was run-down on Sunday night, eschewing his usual cup of booze for honey and hot water, but that didn’t stop the Songbyrd audience from making strange, off-putting requests.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

Even a stripped-down Nine Inch Nails concert is still an extra-sensory marvel

“As the mastermind behind Nine Inch Nails for three decades, Trent Reznor has made rage his default: at himself, at others, at God, at the political system. That’s how it remained Tuesday night at the Anthem.”

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Flash of the Spirit festival hopes you give world music a chance

“Before the Internet, Jim Thomson used to scan the newspaper for musical performances. Years ago, he came across a listing for Ahmed Abdul-Malik, a name he recognized as playing oud (a Middle Eastern lute) on an obscure John Coltrane live album. He wound up seeing Abdul-Malik perform at the Richmond public library for about 10 people.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

JPEGMAFIA screams out love (and provocation) to fans at Songbyrd

“It was about 9 p.m. Saturday night, and the basement of Songbyrd was already sticky with sweat. The low, fairy-light-festooned ceiling and the sold-out, couple-hundred-deep crowd made the venue feel claustrophobic — and that was before everyone took two giant steps forward in an attempt to get as close as possible to JPEGMAFIA as he took the stage.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

When he’s not playing the victim, a Drake concert is a wonder to behold

“As Drake paced and galloped across a barren stage in the middle of Capital One Arena on Thursday night, the floor’s full-sized video screen transformed into a field of lava, an infinity pool or a galaxy of stars, depending on his mood.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

Stronger Sex is embarking on a fantastical voyage

“There was a book — Italo Calvino’s fantastical, metaphorical “Invisible Cities” — and Johnny Fantastic had a plan: to construct a “sound creation” of the images of the first chapter. If you want to know what the work of an Italian fabulist reconstructed as experimental electronic pop sounds like, then Stronger Sex — the D.C. duo of Fantastic and Leah Gage — is for you.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

The women wrestlers of WWE have created a movement. Is it built to last?

“When World Wrestling Entertainment star Sasha Banks started watching wrestling as a child, her favorite wrestler was Eddie Guerrero, one of the most charismatic, creative and technically gifted wrestlers of all time. Her options for a favorite female wrestler were more limited.

“At that time, there were great, athletic women that would have matches that would be two or three minutes long. Or bikini contests,” she recalls. “As a little girl, at 10 years old, to tell your mom you want to be in the WWE . . . she doesn’t really want to support that dream you have.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

Rico Nasty’s homecoming celebration shows a rapper on the verge of stardom

“There were two moments from Rico Nasty’s Wednesday night show at the Fillmore Silver Spring that tell you all you need to know about the Largo, Md.-born rapper. There was the time late in the show when she demanded the sold-out crowd open up an “all-girl mosh pit” and “just have fun.” The other was earlier in the show, when she brought out her 2-year-old son, Cameron, and held the bewildered toddler on her hip while she rapped. “This is for all my young mamas,” she told the audience. “Don’t let ’em tell you what you can and can’t do.”

Read more in The Washington Post.

Rapper-producer Black Milk is ‘always pushing the envelope’

“On his new album, “Fever,” Black Milk raps, “No satisfaction for my effort is ever enough.” That lyric is shorthand for the Detroit rapper-producer’s hustle. “Never being complacent or satisfied with anything, having a certain type of focus, trying to get to the next level, that’s a part of my personality,” he says. “I’m always pushing the envelope, musically, creatively or with my career.””

Read more in The Washington Post.

Janelle Monáe brings her truth to Washington

“For years, Janelle Monáe played an androgynous android, all suits, saddle shoes and pompadours, tap-dancing across the soul-music spectrum with a heavy dose of Afrofuturism. But no matter how good her music was, the arm’s-length distance between Monáe’s art and her audience sold her short. That was then, and the Monáe that astonished on Friday night at the Anthem is now.”

Read more in The Washington Post.